Rogue

Rogue

Okt 11, 2016 | No Comments

Everyone looks cool in leather.

Description:
– 1971 Raleigh ‘Sirocco’
– Silver chromed
– Dressed in stingray leather
– Finished with Brooks saddle & bartape
– Moustache steering

Donated

Madpac chooses Hutspot for Fashion Editorial
In Blog

Madpac chooses Hutspot for Fashion Editorial

Dec 15, 2015 | No Comments

Hutspot, the flamboyantly orange road bike designed in honour of a Dutch potato dish, was used in Madpac’s latest fashion editorial: Sport in the City.

I love their pictures!! A real honour for my bike.

Madpac is an online lifestyle magazine for men giving you the latest in entertainment, gear, fashion, art, culture, video and photograhpy. They invest great effort and care in producing high class work. As can be seen in the pictures below. Do visit their website to view the full editorial.

CREDITS
Photography: Elmar Krop @ Sticky Stuff
Styling and production: Im Fong Liu
Hair and make-up: Yvonne Nusdorfer @ Angelique Hoorn
Model: Arjan van Kesteren @ Republic Men
Publication: Madpac.nl

 

In Blog

Logo Animation

Nov 30, 2015 | No Comments

We are very happy with our new Velo Vintage logo animation created by Dimitry van den Berg from Brainbulb. One of the uses for this logo animation will be as an introduction to our YouTube instruction clips.

In Shop

Pepita

Nov 27, 2015 | No Comments

Stylishly dressed and smartly presented.

Description:
– 1987 Gazelle ‘Champion Mondial’ mixte frame
– Granite powdercoat dressed in ‘pied de poule’ fabric
– Apple green Brooks saddle and handlebar
– Singlespeed city rhythmn gear ratio
– Sleek chrome design

For sale: € 1.850

Cadex

Cadex

Sep 18, 2015 | No Comments

Conversion time: turning a typical road bike into a classic randonneur.

Description:
– 1992 Giant Cadex carbon frame
– Cockpit: moustache handlebar with inverse brake levers
– Lighting: SON 28 dynamo hub and SON Edelux II headlight
– Riding comfort: Grand Bois gumwall 700 x 28c tyres
– Storage: Brooks ‘Brick Lane’ roll-up panniers and Challenge tool bag

Sold

Giant Cadex – Road bike turned randonneur
In Blog

Giant Cadex – Road bike turned randonneur

Sep 16, 2015 | No Comments

Giant Cadex, a carbon road bike for the masses.

Through the door came this Giant Cadex 2 x 7 speed road bike. Its owner wanted it transformed to a randonneur, planning to use it for travel to and from the office. In good and in bad weather. Day and night.

What stroke me right away was the beautiful woven pattern of the carbon fibers, hiding under a layer of shiny transparent paint. Using glue the black tubes connected to aluminium lugs, a perfect colour match. I could already see how this would match and contrast with the vintage look I was going to give it.

The Giant Cadex, which was the first mass produced carbon road bike from the late 80s, came equipped with a full Shimano 600 tricolor group. Being a great fan of the quality of the past, I revised and re-used as many original parts as possible. Luckily my customer wanted a fully equipped randonneur with only the finest components. What a nice assigment!

So there I went and installed the following. Electricity is produced by a SON 28 hub dynamo which delivers its output to a SON Edelux II headlight and SON rear light. The cockpit contains a ‘moustache’ handle bar, Brooks ochre bartape, SOMA inverse brake levers and a Crane Suzu copper bell. Seating is taken care off by a Brooks Professional ochre saddle which I broke in using Lon Haldeman’s method. Goods can be carried in the large asphalt coloured Brooks ‘Brick Lane’ roll-up panniers – which are supported by a Velo Orange Constructeur rear rack – and a Brooks ochre Challenge tool bag. Riding comfort is supplied by Grand Bois 700 x 28c gumwall tyres.

Although it truly is a Giant Cadex, no visual reminders remain. All stickers were sanded off and a new transparent coating was applied. Its decal now hiding under a ‘Design by VeloVintage‘ logo. Last Sunday the now finished bike starred in a final photoshoot. With that came the moment to say goodbye to it and return it to its owner.

KPCykler Pop-Up Store in Copenhagen
In Blog

KPCykler Pop-Up Store in Copenhagen

Aug 12, 2015 | No Comments

Meeting Kaspar Peek of KPCykler in Copenhagen by chance. Nice bikes he makes, with a real vintage appeal!

This picture was taken with Instagram:

KPCykler pop-up store, Copenhagen

#norrebro #copenhagen #fixie #fixedgear #handbuilt #bicycle #velovintage

Instagram filter used: Amaro

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Sögreni bicycles Copenhagen
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Sögreni bicycles Copenhagen

Aug 12, 2015 | No Comments

Taking a peek at Sögreni Bicycles in Copenhagen. Besides bicycles, they design and produce their own parts. In the picture you are looking at various fenders – metal, aluminium and copper – before they are bend and installed. We were met by a sturdy and grumpy shop owner, who was quick to comment that “I was going to steal his design ideas”. (Which are real nice, I have to admit). This did not put me off and I could not resist buying a pair of fenders and some nice matching pedals while we were there. On the downside, it put me back an unreasonable amount of money. Really, too much. But hey, I now own some real Danish designer items!

#fenders #sogreni #copenhagen #bicycle #vintage #velovintage #danishdesign

This picture was taken with Instagram. Filter used: Valencia

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Instagram
In Blog

Instagram

Aug 11, 2015 | No Comments

This picture was taken with Instagram:

Scouting Copenhagen for locations to sell my vintage bikes.
#coffeebreak #coffee #espresso #flatwhite #parterre #velovintage #christianshavn

Instagram filter used: Hefe

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Spoke length – How to calculate it!
In Blog, DIY

Spoke length – How to calculate it!

Aug 1, 2015 | No Comments

Get the right spoke length, it is easy as pie!

Spoke length and how to calculate it, is the very important first step in building your own bicycle wheel. A job that is not as difficult as some people want you to believe it is. True, it needs practice to get good at it. Almost like learning to play an instrument. But the steps to get there are simple and straightforward. If you stick to them you will make it work. And it gives great satisfaction to ride a bike whose wheels you build yourself. Also it gives you the freedom to choose your own combination of hub and rim.

Personally I learned the wheel building basics from many YouTube videos, like this funny one. But all of them seemed to lack something. As if they only scratch the surface, leaving the essence untouched. As a result my wheels worked, but only imperfectly. This changed when I came across a wheel building guide put together by Roger Musson. From his vast experience in wheel building he wrote down exactly what you need to know. Nothing less, and – to my delight – nothing more. All the BS is excluded and he focuses on the practical side of it. If you are serious about building, and I assume you are, I strongly recommend you get his manual (which he provides at a very affordable price). It was his guide that taught me to perfect my game, build wheels like playing an instrument and turn this work into art!

In the video I show how you calculate the required spoke length:

Back to DIY page.